Animals and Essential Oils

Animals and doTerra Essential Oils

Essential oils offer a unique natural way of keeping our animals healthy and happy in a respectful and non-invasive way. Animals love interacting with aromatics but it is important to do it in a safe and effective way.

Animals need to self select – they intuitively know what is best for them –ie when cats eat grass. When you offer an animal an essential oil they will give you a clear sign which they prefer.

I visited a stables with my oils and there were two horses there who I knew nothing about.  We used the self selection method and both horses chose blends of oils by doTerra.   The dark horse chose Motivate and you can see how much he liked it whilst the white horse chose Passionand licked the hand of the owner to show she liked it.

We learnt that both horses had been on box rest due to injuries and therefore they were selecting the oils they needed relating to how they felt.  Other oils we showed them they turned their heads away which is a sign they didn’t need that.

Here are some pointers from Dr.Janet Roark the Essential Oil Vet.

Dilute, dilute, dilute

This is VERY important for dogs and small animals!!!

Start out with your oils MORE diluted when introducing Essential Oils topically to your pet.

You can use carrier oils such as Fractionated Coconut Oil, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Almond Oil, etc. to dilute your essential oil.

You can always increase the concentration if the desired effect is not reached, but it is difficult to remove an Essential Oil once it has already been absorbed.

Remember, each animal is an individual and your pet may be more or less sensitive than others. Observe their behavior – they will tell you!

Did I mention… Dilute!!!

For Dogs and Cats:

  • Dilute for topical use.
  • Know your pet’s health status.
  • Do NOT use oils on or near eyes, ears, nose, or genitals of your pet.
  • Use a water diffuser for aromatic use and allow your pet to roam freely with an open door to the room.
  • Caution should be used around animals that are pregnant, nursing, young, or on certain medications.
  • Do not use oils topically on your pet if using a topical medication or dermal patch – this includes topical flea/ tick preventatives.
  • Do not give any of the products containing xylitol (toothpaste, beadlets, etc.) to your pet.
  • Only use Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils.
  • Observe your pet’s behaviour.
  • In the event of an adverse reaction, dilute with a carrier oil – skin irritation is the most common, and most reactions resolve within 24–48 hours after oil exposure. Discontinue use of an oil if your pet shows signs of distress, drooling, squinting, rubbing their face, vocalization, shaking, vomiting, or diarrohea.

Oils to Avoid with Cats

Oils to avoid topically and internally with cats: Basil, Citrus Oils (Bergamot, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime, Orange, Tangerine), Birch, Cinnamon, Clove, Dill, Fennel, Melaleuca (Tea Tree), Oregano, Peppermint, Thyme, Rosemary, Spearmint, and Wintergreen.

Oils to Avoid with Dogs

Oils to avoid topically and internally with dogs: Birch, Melaleuca (Tea Tree), and Wintergreen. Use caution with hot oils such as Oregano, Cassia, Cinnamon, Clove, Rosemary, and Thyme.

For Horses, Cattle, and Goats:

  • Only use Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils.
  • Know your horse’s health status and the medications and supplements they are currently taking.
  • Do NOT use oils on or near eyes, ears, nose, or genitals of your horse.
  • Use Caution with topical application of “hot” oils such as Oregano, Thyme, Clove, Cassia, and Cinnamon – dilution may be needed for these oils.
  • Do NOT use water to dilute an essential oil that you’ve already applied. Rather, dilute with a carrier oil, like vegetable oil or fractionated coconut oil.
  • Do not apply oils after bathing while the horse is still wet.
  • Do not use essential oils at the same time as another topical medication, including dermal patches.
  • Do not panic if your horse has skin irritation or an adverse reaction. Immediately dilute the area with a carrier oil – most of these resolve within a few hours with dilution.
  • Do NOT apply oils to the saddle area prior to riding.
  • Caution should be used around animals that are pregnant, nursing, young, or on certain medications.
  • Oils to avoid during pregnancy: Arborvitae, Basil, Birch, Cassia, Cinnamon, Rosemary, Thyme, Wintergreen.
  • Observe your horse’s behavior when using or applying essential oils.
  • In the event of an adverse reaction, dilute with a carrier oil – skin irritation is the most common, and most reactions resolve within 24–48 hours after oil exposure.
By | 2019-07-22T11:38:27+00:00 July 22nd, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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